Patronym, matronym & filionym

"Sad Poncho Night." Orion Will, at Bulburin National Park, Queensland. One image that pretty much sums up the trip for him. Also collected some undescribed carabid beetles here.

“Sad Poncho Night.” Orion Will, at Bulburin National Park, Queensland. One image that pretty much sums up the trip for him. Also collected some undescribed carabid beetles here.

Creative control over the formation of names is one privilege taxonomists have. While most are run of the mill descriptive or locality-based names, patronyms are also very common. Flies have been named for Beyoncé’s voluptuous derrière, carabid beetles named for Governator’s tree-trunk quads and slime-mold beetles for our former (and in my opinion dreadfully bad) president and vice-president (link to article, and here). Lots of species are also named for people that contribute in various ways to the progress of taxonomic science in a more direct or personal way. In my recently published “A taxonomic review, new species and a key to species of Platycoelus Blanchard, 1843 (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Pterostichini)available at Zootaxa (With a key to species!) I had the opportunity to recognize my wife, Chong Hee, for her enduring tolerance of my walkabouts over the last 30+ years and her support (moral and material) in general, with a fine, newly described species from the Cape York Peninsula, QLD. Also my son, Orion Will, who has been my stoic, if somewhat reluctant, field assistant on trips like the one we had across parts of Queensland.

I guess I should have mentioned the land leeches before we left the USA.

The Purple Pub in Normanton, QLD. A place to stay near the type locality of Platycoelus orion.

The Purple Pub in Normanton, QLD. A place to stay near the type locality of Platycoelus orion.

Of the many specimens from our trip, several new species were collected including the then undescribed Platycoelus orion from Normanton, home of the Purple Pub.

 

 

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About Kip Will

I'm an insect systematist with expertise in carabid beetles, who is always happiest in the bush.
This entry was posted in Carabids, Entomology, Pterostichines. Bookmark the permalink.

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